Tuesday, 8 January 2019

The Trouble with Blogging | Blogging Stuff

The trouble with writing a post like this is that it can be misinterpreted as a 'moaning/woe is me' kind of post. I hope you don't think so after you've read it. To be honest, it's been going around my head for AGES so for selfish reasons, I want to get it out of there to make room for more important stuff.

This post originated because within this world of blogging in the past year, I have experienced a couple of things that I'm uncomfortable with and I know I'm not alone. I don't see other bloggers referring to it openly but I've seen a few instances where it's been alluded to. Bloggers work alone and in competition with others so there's not always open discussion amongst us. I'm hoping my post helps other bloggers to open up and share their experiences.

Payment on Time

I get very little paid work from the blog - mostly because I've opted out of many of the organised schemes that you can sign up to. I'm not a fan of the blanket PR approach that these schemes encourage - you know when you go onto Instagram and everyone's going on about the same product? I'm amazed that brands think this is a good approach - all I ever hear is readers complaining about being tortured at every turn by the same #ad content.

The paid work I do take on is well researched and there tends to be a considerable amount of time spent preparing/discussing/agreeing content prior to actually agreeing to do the work. I always ask whom else is doing the project which can often result in me turning down the opportunity. It doesn't appeal if 10 other bloggers are also involved with content scheduled to hit the same week/month and it's one of the reasons I've actively sought an alternative source of income.  But at times of the year that my other work is lighter and in the lead up to Christmas or holidays, I'll often take on a couple of extra projects.

Payment is a massive issue though. We are obliged to declare the work as being paid with a #ad but there are more and more businesses that aren't actually paying or delaying payment to such an extent that you end up wishing you never did the job in the first place. My genuine endorsement of a product soon becomes a regret as I realise the business hasn't enough respect to pay me within a generous 30 day window.

It's a tricky one because if I call it out, I might never get paid...so I can't name names in this blog post but I will say that I'm working with a brand where I've created a considerable amount of content that's currently being approved by them. They've had it now for about 6 weeks. Apparently there's a backlog that they're trying to get through and I won't be paid until they approve mine. However, the work is done from my perspective.

It's not a massive amount of money to them. In fact, I know that the other bloggers involved got paid more than I did - there's that lack of discussion again! But it is a lot of money for me and I agreed to the project in August because I knew I would be glad of the income for Christmas.
I'm still waiting to be paid in January and the worst thing is that I feel the content I created will look like it's out of date by the time I do get approval. I've had my hair cut since for one thing. So I feel uncomfortable publishing it so long after it was created. But if I go creating it again, it's extra work for me and an even longer wait for further approval and payment.

You saw a #ad and maybe were disappointed that I sold out to a brand. Well, I've not got paid yet so I feel like a right mug! Which leads me nicely to my other issue with blogging....

Approval of Content

In 2018, this was my biggest bugbear. It goes against everything that blogging and social media has helped deliver in terms of transparency in the consumer space. I've been blogging for 8 years and for the first 6 or so years, when working with brands, I published whatever content and images I wanted to and the first time you saw the content was the first time the brand saw the content. That's the whole point of working with bloggers - it's the real person on the street's opinion delivered in their own style and you will have done enough research on the blogger in advance to know they've got enough integrity to create the right sort of content.

Over the past 18 months or so however, the paid content I've been invited to do has in 90% of cases, involved the brand approving the content before it goes live. I've pulled out of many many collaborations because this stipulation has been in the contract (yes...there are contracts now!). In fact, the brand I'm awaiting payment from above was a real 'will I/won't I' situation as I felt so uncomfortable about the pre-recorded stories and pre-written instagram posts. But Christmas was looming....I wish I'd not bothered.

Pre-approved content gets me on a few fronts. At a fundamental level, it's dictating what the blogger says. It's all going to be true and factual of course, but blogger opinion is definitely constrained. I know that there things I can't say or things I need to craft carefully if I want to get the content approved. For instance, you can't ever refer to another brand in your content.

But a bigger issue is that it devalues the blogger. It demonstrates a complete lack of trust in the person you're asking to work with you. The brand is overlooking the honest, quality content which that blogger has been creating for years. I should say here that with these collaborations, we are given a brief to explain what things we can and can't say. Even with this clear guidance, the brand STILL can't leave it up to the blogger. It's insulting and I'm actually disappointed that so many bloggers agree to this. As long as bloggers keep agreeing to submit content for pre-approval, brands will keep asking for it. If you are a blogger, I urge you to push back - I have done every time I'm asked and in about half the approaches, the brand has agreed to new terms. There are enough influential bloggers out there who can change this carry on - for the benefit of our readers and our integrity.

Because what's worse about approved content is that it's so easy to spot as a consumer and it makes me want to switch right off. I don't mind my fellow bloggers mixing paid content with organic content but if I see the telltale signs of fuzzy instagram stories (quality degrades when you save stories down and re-publish them) or bloggers in the sunshine when it's raining outside...or bloggers who are sitting in the daylight saying 'good morning' on a story that gets published that evening, I'm going to swipe onto the next story. That's a lot of wasted marketing spend. A blogger might tell you X thousand people saw their story but how many people swiped away during or after that first story? I'm never asked for that statistic interestingly enough but it's supplied to the blogger by Instagram for every story.


What's next?

Many people are lamenting the future of blogging. Both from the point of view of bloggers maintaining a site like this one - quite time consuming when there's so much demand for content on social media too - and from the point of view of it actually being a viable marketing channel.

In terms of maintaining a site like this, I urge all bloggers reading to not neglect your URL in favour of Instagram. This website space is precious - it gives you a voice without competition, it's google gold and it will still be here long after Instagram falls out of favour.

In terms of influencer marketing, I can't see it existing in its current form 12 months from now. In fact, it's changing already. Consumers are switching off from the #ads and bloggers and brands need to be more creative going forward. I think partnerships and collaborations are the more effective way to work together in 2019. For example, instead of a blogger having a facial at a different place every month, that blogger becomes an ambassador for one place - going on a journey with this business and showing loyalty to it. Consumers want to trust the content and the people behind it and this trust will need to be earned over a longer period of time. Equally the brand needs to stop rushing to get as many bloggers as possible on board. Be picky and work closely with a few credible ones who are a good fit for your business.

2019 will also see a continuation in the push back on consumerism generally with a bigger focus on buying less and buying well. Bloggers who embrace this will protect their integrity. Working with fewer brands on a more loyal basis - brands that are themselves making an effort in the sustainability space - will be the sort of content readers will respond to.


Over to you...

This has been a cathartic post to write...I'm simultaneously exhausted and relieved I've finally got it down on paper and out of my head. And now I'm looking forward to your views and opinions. Especially if you're a consumer...a blog reader. I know lots of other bloggers will read this and I want them to understand the view from the other side. To know how readers of blogs feel about the industry...and to help us all to determine what content will be appreciated by you in 2019.

If you can't comment below for techy reasons (one downside of my site is that it can be tricky to leave comments), please drop me an email to avril@alifetostyle.com and with your permission, I will cut and paste the comments here (anon if requested) to add to the debate.

Thank you for reading,

Ax
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38 comments

  1. Hi Avril, I really appreciated this article and recently I have unfollowed quite a few bloggers as their ads are so ungenuine and basically feels forced and I agree with the same thing at the same time you almost know when it's a cheese triangle month! I loved a clothes company (starts with bo ends with n) but know feel like I'm trying to be a blogger if I wear it now. I love instagram but don't want to be a blogger and I think my opinion can sometimes be seen as not relevant. Will instagram just become bloggers doing ads for one another? Yours is always the account I will go to for GENUINE recommendations and advice and a handful of others. I hope you and others like you continue to grow and other bloggers take heed because as a consumer my fingers will do the talking. Thank you ps thanks for the sale tips blogs thoroughly read.

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    1. It's interesting that it's actually put you off a brand - this is important information for bloggers and brands to know!! I've tried so hard to keep my content genuine though I'll put my hands up and say that I'm not earning from the majority of it so that makes it easier...and I prefer it that way. I'm so glad I've been able to (finally!) find an alternative source of income.
      Having said that, I don't want to come across as knocking anyone who's being paid well for #ad content...everyone is free to do what they want. But I don't like this sense of the brands dictating it all & taking away freedom of content - that's what I'm really rallying against here and I hope other bloggers will take note in this regard. Thanks so much for your comment Elizabeth - really appreciate you taking the time to leave it x

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  2. Hi Avril, it’s a very thought provoking post. The ad’s are a bit tedious but I understand that’s how bloggers earn their cash so accept it. It’s very obvious though when people are signing up to every ad going regardless of how it fits their account. I’m dubious of certain recommendations and also wonder how much is given in freebies/heavy discounts in return for mentions. We’re not stupid and it irritates me when we as followers are urged to spend our money when the blogger advocating we do so has not. I love your insta and blog and believe in it and afar you say. I suspect brands will soon realise that the more authentic bloggers are a better return on investment than the very/Tesco/laughing cow/Boden/joules brigade. Shame on that company incidentally, not good enough at all xox

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    1. Thank you - it took a lot of time to craft it the right way and as you say, it's income that many bloggers rely on and I don't begrudge anyone earning off what they've spent many hours growing and creating online. I'm so uncomfortable about this mass coverage that brands are adopting...they know they can buy it as so many bloggers need the money. For years they got away with not paying anyone and now they're paying, they're dictating every word. I hope it will change as more brands realise, like you say, that it's not a good way to spend marketing budgets. That working longer term with fewer bloggers where the product is a really good fit, is the way to go forward. And thanks re the non payment...have been sent some really helpful information to go back to the brand with. Hoping it helps move things forward. Thanks for taking the time to comment x

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  3. Completely on board with your comments. I am in the process of Insta cleansing and I am only keeping the bloggers who truly remain honest to their own brand. I appreciate blogging as a form of advertising as long as it retains its integrity, I like reviews, i rely on them for most purchases, so please keep going with your honest shopping and product reviews. As for the contract/payment nonsense, I can only imagine your frustration!

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    1. That's a great way to look at it and I agree - I do rely on other bloggers for reviews - paid or not. It's possible to work for a brand but retain integrity...I hope more bloggers push to do this. And yes - so frustrating on the payment. I've been sent some links to resources, including wording on how to request the payment asap. Hoping I can clear it all up soon and put it down to experience...never again! Thanks for taking the time to comment x

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  4. A few years ago when I was still taking collaborations I had one instance of not getting paid at all when Mode Media shut down. They had horribly long turn around on paying bloggers and so a project I had done 6 months previous I lost out on. Another company that no longer exists I had to beg and plead for them to pay me. I wasn't sure if it was their accountant or what but it was like pulling teeth. I decided that since I was working full time at a well paying job I wasn't going to be bothered with these collabs any more. It isn't worth the hassle. But again my blog isn't my day job. I like the long term partnership thing. You know send me some free swag, pay me a retainer and I will blog about your brand, one that I hopefully already love. I loathed the Olay whip nonsense from 2018. Most of those girls don't use that brand so it was just bad. Ann Taylor is another that hires outside their target market for collaborations which is just bad in my mind.

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    1. So that's where I'm at now - exactly like you....they're not worth it now I'm working again and time is precious too - I don't want to waste it on stuff I'm not going to get paid for....or will have to wait months. Equally, I don't want to bite the hand that feeds me as work is not permanent and I could need to go back to the blog in the future. It's a difficult one. I didn't mention above but I'm also owed money by a large retail outlet that recently was bought over by another not so nice retail outlet. No chance of getting paid there either...long term partnership with retainers is the only way to work going forward. Thanks so much for taking the time to comment - so great to get your insight and to know I'm not alone in the non payment space x

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  5. Ebay about two months, practically every US blog I read had an ebay post. After the first one, you could tell by the second para of every other blog that it was going to be the same text, clearly the statements that had been mandated "did you know x%is new stock, how exciting"!
    I don't use instagram so prefer blogs anyway. Blogging is like a lot of creative fields though where companies and people don't feel that creative "fun" stuff should be expensive.

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    1. Ah yes - I remember the eBay one and some people did it really well! But it's interesting that you picked up on that content being the same. This is the challenge when you're given these briefs of what you can and can't say. It borders on being unethical. Thanks for taking the time to comment - really appreciate it x

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  6. Avril thanks so much for sharing this as a blogger myself it's good to hear and as a reader of blogs it's a little disappointing that reviews can in a sense be scripts. You may as well just read what the company writes about the product on their website. I've worked with a couple of companies just over this last and thankfully none have been so scripted, however none of those have actually been paid for, it's been more of a collaboration and free product. This post is definitely an eye opener.

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    1. Thanks Zane - totally agree about it reading just like a corporate website or press release. There's no doubt that the control shifts to the brand as soon as money is involved..and this is what needs to change. Bloggers have fought to be paid for promoting brands and its become more of a norm for decent sized blogs that have been established for a while to expect payment for the time and effort involved in collaborating but this practice of dictating the content and approving it before it goes live is the bit that borders on unethical. We shouldn't have to give up our content in exchange for the money - I do think if all bloggers stood together on this, it would have to stop. Let's hope so...and thanks so much for taking the time to comment...it's lovely to see your name pop up. Hopefully see you soon! x

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  7. I am new to reading blogging posts and hadn't really understood how many hoops you made were to jump through. I really disagree with the idea of companies okaying your blog. The whole reason for me is to find a genuine review on shops and clothing and I really enjoy your blogs. I also understand that you have to make a living so I appreciate there is a fine line. I suppose it's all about personal integrity. Well done for writing this blog as I am sure we can all appreciate that going live with this may jeopardise other work.
    Shame on the larger companies for with holding your payment

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    1. It's absolutely a fine line Sara - you've put it so well in your comment. I don't think it's unreasonable to give a blogger freedom with their content, within the limits of a campaign brief. It's what M&S asked of me before Christmas when I did their food campaign on Instagram and they were very happy with what I published...they saw it when it went live, not before. They trusted me - it meant a lot and got me thinking about writing this post. I think if all bloggers push back on it, it should change - here's hoping. I know I'm not doing anymore of it from here on in. No matter the money. And yes...I've a strongly worded email ready to go to that company tonight. Fingers crossed x

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  8. Thank you Avril for another great insightful post. You are one of the first bloggers I followed and one that I still trust. I’ll often buy from your recommendations. As you know I now blog myself but have purposely kept it to a hobby, or a review in return for a gifted product. Sometimes I wonder if that’s the right decision but then I remember thE it’s the least stressful! I get to do something I enjoy, I get to help others and I have complete autonomy! And I as don’t need to earn money I can continue as I am �� but thank you for the reminder that that’s okay! And keep doing what you’re doing! Michelle x

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    1. Aw Michelle - so lovely to hear from you and I hear you about blogging being a hobby. It's definitely less complicated but it's tempting to accept the opportunities when they're offered. Especially as there are real costs to running a blog - URL renewals for one thing! I've just forked out £95 for mine as I still hold onto the School Gate Style one and a few iterations of A Life To Style. Probably not necessary but I'm not the most techy of people to know if it is or not. So yes, keep enjoying it but don't worry about taking on opportunities if you think they're a good fit and your readers will enjoy. Thanks so much for taking the time to comment as always, x

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  9. Avril, this is such an interesting read and you have articulated so eloquently what so many of us are thinking. I no longer have any interest in buying from Boden or Joules even though I used to buy from them regularly for myself and my children as it irks me that they give clothes to the same handful of bloggers. The more I see people wearing the same thing the less inclined I am to buy it. I wont be buying clothes from Very or exercise wear from F&F clothing for the same reason. I would love to see these companies give products to people who could really benefit from it too (maybe some already do) as I am sure they would be appreciated at hospitals, hospices and shelters. I also worry about the amount of stuff we are all accumulating and that most of it will end up in landfill and not to mention all the packaging that comes with it, I heard recently that an item bought from ASOS will only be worn 3 times before it is discarded.
    It is obvious that you work really hard on your blog, I always enjoy reading and value what you have to say as you strike me as someone who stays true to their principles and wouldn't promote something that you didn't believe in yourself.
    I am sorry that you have been treated unfairly and good for you for calling it out.

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    1. Therese, thanks for taking the time to message - you've articulated exactly what I suspected regarding blanket coverage that's undertaken by the brands you've mentioned. It's such a shame they can't think outside the box a bit and maybe work with a running club or an athletics group for kids in the case of the exercise gear. Or like you say with a refugee charity or women refuge/homeless charity on the clothing side of things? Maybe they do and don't promote it? Let's hope so.
      And I'm so with you on the accumulation of stuff - I'm as guilty as the next woman in that regard though I'm proud to say I've not shopped in H&M/Primark/ASOS/Zara/Tesco etc for months - it wasn't as hard as I thought. I've an ethical shopping post coming up in a couple of days actually...I appreciate it's still encouraging people to shop but I'm hoping it raises awareness of the great shops online that sell ethical and sustainable fashion...and it's all really lovely!
      But I'm rambling on - I need to go chase that invoice! Will update on the blog if and when it's paid! x

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  10. Great article Avril. I'm a consumer and one of those who switches off when all the add stuff starts. It puts me off completely when you see several bloggers with the same products at the same time. I have unfollowed numerous accounts as a result. I just don't trust the message. I really appreciate your style of blogging, local businesses, honest opinions, and proper real life advice (sales shopping ��). Jx

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    1. Thanks so much for sharing that - it's really interesting and confirms what I suspected. I hope things change in 2019. And I so appreciate your encouragement - really lovely to hear you enjoy the blog and my shopping habits! I'm trying to rein it in this year - eek! x

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  11. Hi Avril,

    I only follow and read a handful of bloggers who I enjoy reading with relevant, interesting content and who are articulate. Even with just the handful that I read I was recently surprised (in a negative way) to read in a bloggers Q&A that she requests bundles of clothes from companies that she works with but openly admits that she then styles and puts outfits together that she doesn’t need for her lifestyle . After the pics are taken and she no longer needs them the clothes go to her friends or charity shops!!! It is disappointing to think of the environmental and ethical impact that has for a few pictures . I love the fact that you re-mix old pieces, I’ve seen (and admired) your Tesco jeans many times and I know that you only feature items that you actually like!!! Thank goodness there are a few blogs with integrity!! Well done for making a stand and being so transparent . Rachel

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    1. Ah Rachel - thanks so much....from reading all these comments, it really feels like it's time for things to change. That's awful for a blogger to admit to...she's clearly living in a bubble if she thinks that's ok to talk openly about. I'm in the middle of writing a blog about some of the great ethical brands that have sales on at the moment. A great opportunity to try them out as they can be more expensive and it makes people reluctant to try them. I definitely want to buy less and keep working my wardrobe which is hard for a committed shopper who feels the need to have fresh content on here but it's all about the balance isn't it?
      Anyway thank you and I love that you've noticed my Tesco jeans - they were the buy of the decade for me - I must have them now for about 5 or 6 years and they're still going strong and as tight as ever...though a bit too tight after Christmas!! x

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  12. I still read, and love blogs. I like to know the thoughts of the real person wearing the clothes, what they think ko the fabric, cut etc. although I only follow a handful now. I hate Instagram, don't use it, and don't understand stories at all.

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    1. That's so good to hear Rachael - I'll keep the effort up here on the blog. Could see Instagram far enough some days...so tempted to give it up!!

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  13. Such an eloquent and honest post Avril, I have no problem with #ad and appreciate that bloggers earn money that way, but I am not interested in reading blurb written by the brand, I want to hear the blogger's opinion, good or bad. It was very courageous of you to write this, well done you. I will still be reading every blog you post and following you on Instagram. Good luck, you may just start a movement here!

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    1. That's what I think too Caroline - why would we want to have content that a brand has ok'd before it is posted? I hope it does make other bloggers think before agreeing to this. Thanks so much for your encouragement x

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  14. As a complete Luddite when it comes to Instagram, I only read your posts via FB. I am a regular reader, as you know (!) and I read one other UK mainland blog, to keep up with the mainland brands we lack here in NI.
    I hope other bloggers heed your words, as you raise so many valid & interesting points in this piece xx

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    1. Thanks Ingrid - I really hope other bloggers do consider it next time they are in talks with a brand. If we start pushing back, then it will change. Appreciate you taking the time to comment x

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  15. Good on you Avril! One of the ways things will change is by people like you speaking out and telling the truth. I think women of our age realise what is “real” and not “real” on instagram as we can tell if everyone is wearing/ eating/ visiting X then it must be a marketing push. Your readership are smart and we have long realised the tension for you as someone who produces content for us to absorb and enjoy and to also makes a financial contribution to their domestic situation. As a freelancer (years ago now) who had recently left a major publisher as an employee but still worked for them I couldn’t believe how slowly I got paid and felt awful for the freelancers I used to employee - my only advice is to find the one kind person in the accounts department and cultivate a relationship but it’s not good enough, is it? Thanks for having the courage to write these posts, to acknowledge your readership as worthy of the facts and to share in your blogging life. I know many of us reading this post would think “it sounds too much like hard work and if it was me I wouldn’t be bothered” so thank you for being bothered!

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    1. Ah thank you Pippa - it does feel like a lot of work for not much return but comments like this make it so worthwhile. And actually, if you don't accept tons of paid work, it's a lot less effort I'm finding...both from the point of paperwork and the to-ing and fro-ing agreeing terms and content!
      And thanks for the advice on the payment, I'm still waiting for it but have had an assurance it will go through soon...there is one person being quite helpful but I have a feeling there's something else holding it up. Anyway, thanks for taking the time to comment - it's so encouraging to read! x

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  16. I'm absolutely buying less but buying better quality, which means making careful choices and taking into account the integrity of people I follow.

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    1. This is definitely the trend....I think things are a changing for sure. A bit too slow for my liking but it's all in the right direction. Thanks for taking the time to comment x

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  17. Hi Avril
    I can only comment as a blog reader. I appreciate I am probably a luddite, but I have not signed up to Instagram as my sense of it is that it perpetuates superficiality (get me!!) so I stick with a very small handful of bloggers who still post in the old fashioned way.
    That said, I still skip past paid for/sponsored posts. Even when there's a disclaimer about honest opinions I still find these kinds of posts a complete turn-off. With the best will in the world, if a blogger has been paid for content, and that content has to be pre-approved, I can't really see how a 'their stuff is poor quality/ill-fitting' type comment is going to get through - which is actually really useful for readers to know.
    I appreciate if it's how you make your living then there is little choice for the blogger, really. I can only say how it is for me as a reader, and for me, I like 'real', unpaid for, unsponsored, honest opinion posts.

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    1. That's so good to read - firstly, that blogs are still important to you and also that as I suspected, no matter the context or the format, readers will struggle to take ad content seriously. I get it - I do too. It's a tough balance for bloggers to get right. Thanks for taking the time to comment - great points made x

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  18. Via email : Dear Avril,
    I have read your recent post on blogging.
    I have to say that having followed a number of bloggers over the past few years, I had begun to notice that some posts were becoming very formulaic. Having read your post , I understand why.
    I have no issue with bloggers getting paid for their work BUT , it must be an honest review by an individual or it demeans the whole process. Surely companies have the guts and belief in their products to ‘stand by’ them and take the good with the bad? The whole purpose of constructive criticism is that you take it on board and learn from it.
    I know when I’m being fed a line and simply stop reading the blog. It’s as simple as that.
    I also find it a turn off when companies gather bloggers together for a day out/ night away. It’s a bit unseemly I think and I never both to read the blogs after that because I know what to expect😒😒.
    I’m happy for you to quote me should you find anything of use!!
    Ann, Cardiff

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    1. Thanks Ann....the point you make about companies having the guts and belief in their product is so true. I think some bloggers are underestimating their readership - I really appreciate you making your point so well and really helping me to realise I'm not off the mark here. x

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  19. On point as always Avril - yet another reason why you're one of less than a full handful of bloggers that I still follow on social media. This is actually an issue that comes up with the students I teach a lot - I've now seen evidence of what I had begun to believe myself - that the sustainability movement will be the end of "influencer marketing" in certain industries for all the reasons you and your readers have outlined. And the cream (yourself included) will rise to the top :) I hope 2019 brings you great things!!

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  20. Hi Avril, Great post. As someone who has worked in marketing for almost 20 years and seen trends come and go, i have instinctively worried about the rise in 'influencers', and when i as a marketeer who normally laps up this stuff, cleansed almost all of my instagram from influencers about 6-8months ago, so fed up was i with the ads with staged photos and stories which to be honest just seemed so ungenuine, well that says alot. As a marketeer, brands will soon move onto to a more strategic long term approach again, the good ones that is, and will work with a few partners/amabassadors to collaborate genuinely. The current problem is there feels like there is very little integrity in this current wave of influencers, it is just income influenced. At the same time it feels like the court of public opinion is turning against this fake world they are portraying. So keep doing what you are doing, as it is so very clearly genuine, and find a partner whose values align with yours. Thanks for sharing your post, so refreshing to read what i have been thinking for so long, and perhaps the start of a new direction! Aisling

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I love reading your comments and will reply as soon as I can if you have a specific question. If for any reason, you are unable to leave a comment, just drop me an email at avril@alifetostyle.com or leave a comment on the A Life to Style Facebook Page! Thank you xx

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